Law in the Internet Society

Professor Eben Moglen
Columbia Law School
Fall 2017

Special office hours will be held on Wednesday December 20th, from 12:30-5:30pm.


First drafts of your second essay will be due December 22nd. Please see SecondEssay for template and instructions.


My office hours in fall 2017 will be Tuesdays, 10:45am-noon, and Thursdays, 10:45am-12:30pm and 3:45pm to 5:45pm. If you need to see me but cannot make office hours, please email moglen@columbia.edu or contact my assistant, Michael Weholt, mrw@softwarefreedom.org, 212-461-1905.


On the Radar

David Streitfeld, Tech Giants, Once Seen as Saviors, Are Now Viewed as Threats, New York Times, October 12, 2017

Mawuna Koutonin, No business, no boozing, no casual sex: when Togo turned off the internet, The Guardian, September 21, 2017

Kenneth P. Vogel, Google Critic Ousted From Think Tank Funded by the Tech Giant , New York Times, August 30, 2017

Barry Lynn, I criticized Google. It got me fired. That’s how corporate power works., Washington Post, August 31, 2017

Tom Simonite, Google and Microsoft Can Use AI to Extract Many More Ad Dollars from Our Clicks, Wired News, August 31, 2017

Keith L. Alexander, Judge orders tech company to release Web user data from anti-Trump website, Washington Post, August 24, 2017

Eben Moglen and Mishi Choudhary, Zuckerberg Nobly Carries White Man's Burden: Poor Indians' Data Packets, Indian Express, October 30, 2015

Jim Dwyer, Volkswagen's Diesel Fraud Makes Critic of Secret Code a Prophet, September 22, 2015

Eben Moglen, Transcript: When Software is in Everything: Future Liability Nightmares Free Software Helps Avoid, June 30, 2010

People Love Spying On One Another: A Q & A With Facebook Critic Eben Moglen, Washington Post, November 19, 2014

Watch: IASC & the Elinor Ostrom Award, Commons In Action (2014)

atockar, Riding with the Stars: Passenger Privacy in the NYC Taxicab Dataset, Neustar Research, September 15, 2014

Vindu Goel, How Facebook Sold You Krill Oil, New York Times, August 2, 2014


Topics:

Introduction, Political Economy:
The Way We Live Now

Sociology, Economics, Legal Theory:
Grasping the Net

Copyright and Other Intellectual Improperty:
Anarchists, Authors, and Owners

Carriage Regulation:
Controlling the Switches

Privacy in Private and Public Law:
The State, The Spook, The Cop, Her Wife, and His Lover

Eyes Wide Shut:
Taboo Enforcement and Free Expression

Making Broadcasters Unconstitutional:
Rethinking Media Law

Electronic Democracy:
Restructuring Politics


A Word on Technology Old and New About the Word

This seminar is an attempt to learn about, understand and predict the development of law in a rapidly changing area. We must assemble the field of knowledge relevant to our questions even as we begin trying to answer them. Wiki technology is an ideal match for the work we have in hand. Below you will find an introduction to this particular wiki, or TWiki, where you can learn as much or as little about how this technology works as you want.

For now, the most important thing is just that any page of the wiki has an edit button, and your work in the course consists of writings that we will collaboratively produce here. You can make new pages, edit existing pages, attach files to any page, add links, leave comments in the comment boxes--whatever in your opinion adds to a richer dialog. During the semester I will assign writing exercises, which will also be posted here. All of everyone's work contributes to a larger and more informative whole, which is what our conversation is informed by, and helps us to understand.

Please begin by registering. I look forward to seeing you at our first meeting on the 10th.

Introduction to the LawNetSoc Web

The LawNetSoc site is a collaborative class space built on Twiki [twiki.org], a free software wiki system. If this is your first time using a wiki for a long term project, or first time using a wiki at all, you might want to take a minute and look around this site. If you see something on the page that you don't know how to create in a wiki, take a look at the text that produced it using the "Edit" button at the top of each page, and feel free to try anything out in the Sandbox.

All of the Twiki documentation is also right at hand. Follow the TWiki link in the sidebar. There are a number of good tutorials and helpful FAQs there explaining the basics of what a wiki does, how to use Twiki, and how to format text.

From TWiki's point of view, this course, Law in the Internet Society, is one "web." There are other webs here: the sandbox for trying wiki experiments, for example, and my other courses, etc. You're welcome to look around in those webs too, of course. Below are some useful tools for dealing with this particular web of ours. You can see the list of recent changes, and you can arrange to be notified of changes, either by email or by RSS feed. I would strongly recommend that you sign up for one or another form of notification; if not, it is your responsibility to keep abreast of the changes yourself.

LawNetSoc Web Utilities