Law in the Internet Society

View   r4  >  r3  >  r2  >  r1
SalmanAlmutawaSecondEssay 4 - 01 Mar 2020 - Main.EbenMoglen
Line: 1 to 1
 
META TOPICPARENT name="SecondEssay"

On the digital technologies and usage habits required to protect the freedom of opinion

Line: 29 to 29
 3. Use Tor browser. This browser routes traffic through random IP addresses of thousands of tor volunteer servers and encrypts information at each level.
Added:
>
>
You would perhaps want instead to consider Tails, which would provide the Tor browser and much more.

 4. If one were to use Firefox, then one must ensure that Ad-Block is installed, as well as the option to block third party cookies that are utilized by websites to track user activity.

5. Set up PGP/GPG Encryption for email communications. In addition to encrypting and decrypting email, PGP is used to sign messages so that the receiver can verify both the identity of the sender and the integrity of the content.

6. Use FreedomBox. FreedomBox is a private server which lets users easily install and configure server applications, so that one can host necessary web services at home on a device they own, powered by trusted free software.

Added:
>
>
You might have figured out a little more about what that would empower you to do, in light of the other items on the list.

 7. Use ProtonMail? instead of Gmail. ProtonMail? ’s encryption means that nobody but the user can read the messages in the user’s mailbox, whereas Google can and does gain access to private emails sent between Gmail users. These emails can later find their way to the wrong hands, as Google is in the business of selling such information.

8. Use free operating software such as GNU/Linux instead of MacOS? or Microsoft Windows. This will prevent third party providers of software to gain information on your activities.

Line: 43 to 51
 10. Use DuckDuckGo? instead of the Google search engine. This goes to the same point as above in maintaining privacy online, as the Google search engine keeps track of everything that one types in and researches whereas DuckDuckGo? does not.
Added:
>
>
DuckDuckGo? presently just relays Bing searches, without some of the tracking. Any search engine through a proxy, with some confetti added by, for example, TrackMeNot, would do as well or better.

 11. Delete third party social media platforms including Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat and WhatsApp? . As the Cambridge Analytica whistle-blowers told us, these platforms maintain records of what you like, who your friends are, and even your very private conversations with others, and then provide that information to any third party or government.

12. If necessary, use Signal as a messaging App. Signal gives you encrypted messages, as well as voice and video calls.


SalmanAlmutawaSecondEssay 3 - 03 Feb 2020 - Main.SalmanAlmutawa
Line: 1 to 1
 
META TOPICPARENT name="SecondEssay"
Changed:
<
<

On Freedom of Thought

>
>

On the digital technologies and usage habits required to protect the freedom of opinion

 
Deleted:
<
<
Before taking Professor Moglen’s course, I paid very little attention to my own digital footprint. I wasn’t doing anything criminal – I thought to myself – and so I had nothing to worry about. It did not occur to me what disturbing assumption went into the making of that statement. Namely, that it was Okay for my thoughts to be monitored, for I was a good citizen after all. What if, and only what if, one day I seized to be a good citizen in the eyes of the state? What, then?
 
Deleted:
<
<
The Brits left my home country of Bahrain in 1971, only to be replaced by the Americans that same year. They operate a 7,000-man-strong Navy Base in a corner of Manama we’ve come to call American Alley. At school, my teachers were called Mrs. Ellsbury and Mr. Sipp. They taught me English and I’m sure they’d be happy to know that I made it to Columbia Law School. But what are they all doing in my country?
 
Changed:
<
<
Bahrain grew rich on oil with its discovery in 1931. But for decades, many of the locals complained of discrimination, high unemployment and inadequate housing. The year 2011 marked a year of significant political unrest in the country as protestors gathered in the historical Pearl Roundabout to demand greater political freedoms and economic justice. My classmate Zahra lost her father who was tortured to death in one of Bahrain’s prisons for his work in the demonstrations. Another classmate Sara didn’t see her father for 5 years as he was sent to jail for treating the wounds of injured protestors. What if, and only what if, one day I seized to be a good citizen in the eyes of the state? What, then?
>
>

On the value and dangers of having an opinion

 
Changed:
<
<
That the struggle for justice to persons is a prerequisite to the freedom of thought ought to be self-evident. As Professor Moglen writes, “Because the recognition of individual possibility, to allow each to be what she and he can be, rests inherently upon the availability of knowledge; the perpetuation of ignorance is the beginning of slavery.”
>
>
Before taking Professor Moglen’s course, I paid very little attention to my own digital footprint. I wasn’t doing anything criminal – I thought to myself – and so I had nothing to worry about. It did not occur to me what disturbing assumption went into the making of that statement. Namely, that it was Okay for my thoughts and opinions to be monitored, for I was a good citizen after all. What if one day I seized to be a good citizen in the eyes of the state? What, then?
 
Changed:
<
<
I have never written on this subject before, and I have always avoided talking about it. Maybe because I was too afraid to have an opinion of my own. But if I have to admit, having an opinion makes me feel alive. And my opinion is this: maybe one day my worldview will not be so aligned with that of the state. What, then?
>
>
The year 2011 marked a year of significant political unrest in my home country of Bahrain as protestors gathered to demand greater political freedoms and economic justice. My classmate Zahra lost her father who was tortured to death in one of Bahrain’s prisons for his work in the demonstrations. Another classmate Sara didn’t see her father for 5 years as he was sent to jail for treating the wounds of injured protestors.
 
Changed:
<
<
I slowly began to regain my online privacy in the forms of anonymity, secrecy, and subsequently my autonomy. Google was the first to go. I switched completely to DuckDuckGo? , for it doesn’t track user activity and isn’t in the business of selling information to third parties. I deleted my Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat accounts. As the Cambridge Analytica whistle-blowers told us, these platforms maintain records of what you like, who your friends are, and even your very private conversations with others. They then sell that information to third parties with the intention of understanding how you think in ways that you yourself are not aware of.
>
>
It ought to be self-evident that the struggle for justice to persons hinges on the free and unrestricted expression of opinion. As Professor Moglen writes, “Because the recognition of individual possibility, to allow each to be what she and he can be, rests inherently upon the availability of knowledge; the perpetuation of ignorance is the beginning of slavery.”
 
Deleted:
<
<
I still surf the internet, of course, and make use of its useful resources like Project Gutenberg and the Open Library. However, I do so more carefully. I operate a proxy server through Columbia’s computers such that my internet activity goes through Columbia before reaching a designated website and back. This way, the website can only see Columbia’s IP address rather than my own, thereby maintaining my anonymity online so far as possible.
 
Changed:
<
<
I do this not because I have anything to hide, but simply for the sake of being free to think as I please and do as I please so long I am hurting nobody in the process. Thus, the need to maintain privacy online, as I see it, is for three primary reasons. One, to not be persecuted for having a view which does not conform to that which the people in power possess. Two, to be able to actually form views of my own as opposed to being fed what is right and what is wrong and having my views formed thereunder. And three, simply for the sake of freedom of thought, for it is the most liberating of all the freedoms. As the famous song went, Die Gedanken sind frei; thoughts are free.
>
>

Protecting freedom of opinion in the digital age

 
Changed:
<
<
>
>
I, like hundreds of millions of people around the world, now realize that holding an unpopular opinion could lead to dire consequences on my part. The question is, therefore, “How do I protect myself against my own state?” This is a tricky question, as one expects to receive the protections of the state while necessarily giving up some degree of privacy for the sake of ensuring “national security” and maintaining the peace. It is evident, however, that this excuse has been abused over the years, being used as a scapegoat to ensure the continued exercise of power by a certain group of individuals.
 
Changed:
<
<
I don't think that crediting me so extensively makes the draft better. The focus should be on your ideas, not on mine.
>
>
Given the government’s ability to spy on the digital communications and interactions of its citizens, as countless cases around the world have shown us including the Edward Snowden NSA scandal and the Simone Margaritelli UAE scandal, it is evident that one must take serious precautions to maintain online privacy. I have therefore compiled a list of 15 digital technologies and usage habits that, in my view, must be adopted in order to ensure privacy online.
 
Deleted:
<
<
There are two themes in this draft, which are closely-related in origin, but like two rivers rising in the same watershed, they flow in quite different directions.
 
Changed:
<
<
The first theme concerns your own discovery of the value of freedom of opinion, which leads out from and is not the same as freedom of thought. Your discovery of your own value for the free expression of your opinions, and the related recognition that surrendering privacy ultimately means surrendering freedom of thought, has effects that embrace more than the issue of your digital hygiene. We are in law school together, after all, so if we didn't ask what your changing ideas have to do with your prospective life as a lawyer, we wouldn't be doing our jobs. That's one place the next draft could productively go.
>
>

The 15 Necessities of Online Privacy

 
Deleted:
<
<
The second theme concerns your operative response to realizing that you may not be able to presume your home State's willingness to tolerate, let alone support, your freedom of opinion. This should lead to a discussion of the digital technology and usage habits that are appropriate when your home ground is unsafe. Here you discuss having abandoned some third-party services and using an SSH proxy as I taught you in order to make your browsing more secure. These are useful steps, but if you are going to pursue this aspect of the draft, you need to get more serious. The basic premise is "I, like hundreds of millions of people in different countries around the world, now realize that I cannot trust my government; even my life may be in danger for what I say to others. How do I protect myself against my own state?" That's a tough threat model, so if you really want to explore the answers, you're going to have to think much more carefully. My next course might be more relevant for that inquiry, because it is about government surveillance, not the private service platforms.
 
Changed:
<
<
But for now the point is to improve this draft by choosing one of the two fundamentally different pathways this current first draft conflates. You can pursue either successfully, but not both in 1,000 words.
>
>
1. Set up an SSH proxy server. I operate a proxy server through Columbia’s computers such that my internet activity goes through Columbia before reaching a designated website and back. This way, the website can only see Columbia’s IP address rather than my own, thereby maintaining my anonymity online so far as possible.
 
Changed:
<
<
>
>
2. Use a trusted VPN. This goes to the same point as above, adding a further layer of necessary tracking, as well as preventing websites from directly identifying the user.
  \ No newline at end of file
Added:
>
>
3. Use Tor browser. This browser routes traffic through random IP addresses of thousands of tor volunteer servers and encrypts information at each level.

4. If one were to use Firefox, then one must ensure that Ad-Block is installed, as well as the option to block third party cookies that are utilized by websites to track user activity.

5. Set up PGP/GPG Encryption for email communications. In addition to encrypting and decrypting email, PGP is used to sign messages so that the receiver can verify both the identity of the sender and the integrity of the content.

6. Use FreedomBox. FreedomBox is a private server which lets users easily install and configure server applications, so that one can host necessary web services at home on a device they own, powered by trusted free software.

7. Use ProtonMail? instead of Gmail. ProtonMail? ’s encryption means that nobody but the user can read the messages in the user’s mailbox, whereas Google can and does gain access to private emails sent between Gmail users. These emails can later find their way to the wrong hands, as Google is in the business of selling such information.

8. Use free operating software such as GNU/Linux instead of MacOS? or Microsoft Windows. This will prevent third party providers of software to gain information on your activities.

9. Use free software such as LibreOffice? instead of Microsoft Office. This will prevent third party providers of software from gaining information on your activities.

10. Use DuckDuckGo? instead of the Google search engine. This goes to the same point as above in maintaining privacy online, as the Google search engine keeps track of everything that one types in and researches whereas DuckDuckGo? does not.

11. Delete third party social media platforms including Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat and WhatsApp? . As the Cambridge Analytica whistle-blowers told us, these platforms maintain records of what you like, who your friends are, and even your very private conversations with others, and then provide that information to any third party or government.

12. If necessary, use Signal as a messaging App. Signal gives you encrypted messages, as well as voice and video calls.

13. Routinely check for spyware and other malware on your device as it could be pushed via software updates.

14. Install a privacy screen on your computer, as well as a webcam privacy cover.

15. Only connect to the internet while at home or at a safe and trusted place. Do not connect to the internet while on the go, so as to prevent your precise location from being known.


SalmanAlmutawaSecondEssay 2 - 10 Jan 2020 - Main.EbenMoglen
Line: 1 to 1
 
META TOPICPARENT name="SecondEssay"
Changed:
<
<
On Freedom of Thought
>
>

On Freedom of Thought

 Before taking Professor Moglen’s course, I paid very little attention to my own digital footprint. I wasn’t doing anything criminal – I thought to myself – and so I had nothing to worry about. It did not occur to me what disturbing assumption went into the making of that statement. Namely, that it was Okay for my thoughts to be monitored, for I was a good citizen after all. What if, and only what if, one day I seized to be a good citizen in the eyes of the state? What, then?
Line: 17 to 17
 I still surf the internet, of course, and make use of its useful resources like Project Gutenberg and the Open Library. However, I do so more carefully. I operate a proxy server through Columbia’s computers such that my internet activity goes through Columbia before reaching a designated website and back. This way, the website can only see Columbia’s IP address rather than my own, thereby maintaining my anonymity online so far as possible.

I do this not because I have anything to hide, but simply for the sake of being free to think as I please and do as I please so long I am hurting nobody in the process. Thus, the need to maintain privacy online, as I see it, is for three primary reasons. One, to not be persecuted for having a view which does not conform to that which the people in power possess. Two, to be able to actually form views of my own as opposed to being fed what is right and what is wrong and having my views formed thereunder. And three, simply for the sake of freedom of thought, for it is the most liberating of all the freedoms. As the famous song went, Die Gedanken sind frei; thoughts are free. \ No newline at end of file

Added:
>
>

I don't think that crediting me so extensively makes the draft better. The focus should be on your ideas, not on mine.

There are two themes in this draft, which are closely-related in origin, but like two rivers rising in the same watershed, they flow in quite different directions.

The first theme concerns your own discovery of the value of freedom of opinion, which leads out from and is not the same as freedom of thought. Your discovery of your own value for the free expression of your opinions, and the related recognition that surrendering privacy ultimately means surrendering freedom of thought, has effects that embrace more than the issue of your digital hygiene. We are in law school together, after all, so if we didn't ask what your changing ideas have to do with your prospective life as a lawyer, we wouldn't be doing our jobs. That's one place the next draft could productively go.

The second theme concerns your operative response to realizing that you may not be able to presume your home State's willingness to tolerate, let alone support, your freedom of opinion. This should lead to a discussion of the digital technology and usage habits that are appropriate when your home ground is unsafe. Here you discuss having abandoned some third-party services and using an SSH proxy as I taught you in order to make your browsing more secure. These are useful steps, but if you are going to pursue this aspect of the draft, you need to get more serious. The basic premise is "I, like hundreds of millions of people in different countries around the world, now realize that I cannot trust my government; even my life may be in danger for what I say to others. How do I protect myself against my own state?" That's a tough threat model, so if you really want to explore the answers, you're going to have to think much more carefully. My next course might be more relevant for that inquiry, because it is about government surveillance, not the private service platforms.

But for now the point is to improve this draft by choosing one of the two fundamentally different pathways this current first draft conflates. You can pursue either successfully, but not both in 1,000 words.

 \ No newline at end of file

SalmanAlmutawaSecondEssay 1 - 08 Dec 2019 - Main.SalmanAlmutawa
Line: 1 to 1
Added:
>
>
META TOPICPARENT name="SecondEssay"
On Freedom of Thought

Before taking Professor Moglen’s course, I paid very little attention to my own digital footprint. I wasn’t doing anything criminal – I thought to myself – and so I had nothing to worry about. It did not occur to me what disturbing assumption went into the making of that statement. Namely, that it was Okay for my thoughts to be monitored, for I was a good citizen after all. What if, and only what if, one day I seized to be a good citizen in the eyes of the state? What, then?

The Brits left my home country of Bahrain in 1971, only to be replaced by the Americans that same year. They operate a 7,000-man-strong Navy Base in a corner of Manama we’ve come to call American Alley. At school, my teachers were called Mrs. Ellsbury and Mr. Sipp. They taught me English and I’m sure they’d be happy to know that I made it to Columbia Law School. But what are they all doing in my country?

Bahrain grew rich on oil with its discovery in 1931. But for decades, many of the locals complained of discrimination, high unemployment and inadequate housing. The year 2011 marked a year of significant political unrest in the country as protestors gathered in the historical Pearl Roundabout to demand greater political freedoms and economic justice. My classmate Zahra lost her father who was tortured to death in one of Bahrain’s prisons for his work in the demonstrations. Another classmate Sara didn’t see her father for 5 years as he was sent to jail for treating the wounds of injured protestors. What if, and only what if, one day I seized to be a good citizen in the eyes of the state? What, then?

That the struggle for justice to persons is a prerequisite to the freedom of thought ought to be self-evident. As Professor Moglen writes, “Because the recognition of individual possibility, to allow each to be what she and he can be, rests inherently upon the availability of knowledge; the perpetuation of ignorance is the beginning of slavery.”

I have never written on this subject before, and I have always avoided talking about it. Maybe because I was too afraid to have an opinion of my own. But if I have to admit, having an opinion makes me feel alive. And my opinion is this: maybe one day my worldview will not be so aligned with that of the state. What, then?

I slowly began to regain my online privacy in the forms of anonymity, secrecy, and subsequently my autonomy. Google was the first to go. I switched completely to DuckDuckGo? , for it doesn’t track user activity and isn’t in the business of selling information to third parties. I deleted my Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat accounts. As the Cambridge Analytica whistle-blowers told us, these platforms maintain records of what you like, who your friends are, and even your very private conversations with others. They then sell that information to third parties with the intention of understanding how you think in ways that you yourself are not aware of.

I still surf the internet, of course, and make use of its useful resources like Project Gutenberg and the Open Library. However, I do so more carefully. I operate a proxy server through Columbia’s computers such that my internet activity goes through Columbia before reaching a designated website and back. This way, the website can only see Columbia’s IP address rather than my own, thereby maintaining my anonymity online so far as possible.

I do this not because I have anything to hide, but simply for the sake of being free to think as I please and do as I please so long I am hurting nobody in the process. Thus, the need to maintain privacy online, as I see it, is for three primary reasons. One, to not be persecuted for having a view which does not conform to that which the people in power possess. Two, to be able to actually form views of my own as opposed to being fed what is right and what is wrong and having my views formed thereunder. And three, simply for the sake of freedom of thought, for it is the most liberating of all the freedoms. As the famous song went, Die Gedanken sind frei; thoughts are free.


Revision 4r4 - 01 Mar 2020 - 17:43:42 - EbenMoglen
Revision 3r3 - 03 Feb 2020 - 03:10:02 - SalmanAlmutawa
Revision 2r2 - 10 Jan 2020 - 10:10:07 - EbenMoglen
Revision 1r1 - 08 Dec 2019 - 04:47:07 - SalmanAlmutawa
This site is powered by the TWiki collaboration platform.
All material on this collaboration platform is the property of the contributing authors.
All material marked as authored by Eben Moglen is available under the license terms CC-BY-SA version 4.
Syndicate this site RSSATOM